Tag: purificup

Carstensz Pyramid Gear List

To climb Carstensz Pyramid right now the only option is trekking. Six days up to base camp from Sugapa Village to the Carstensz Pyramid summit at nearly 4900 meters. Then four days to return to the village. There could be a few days of weather to contend with at base camp. You’ll need enough gear to last the two weeks. You’ll also need to be as light as possible, as the porters will only carry 17 kg. That’s about 37 lb.

17 Kilograms per Porter for the Carstensz Pyramid trek
17 Kilograms per Porter for the Carstensz Pyramid trek

Carstensz Pyramid Gear List

Climbing Gear
Alpine climbing harness, adjustable leg loops, fit over all clothing.
Double lanyard (Via Ferrata).
4 Locking carabiners.
Figure 8 Belay-Rappel Device.
1 mechanical ascender with handle.
Climbing helmet, fit with hat on
Trekking boots.
1 Pr rappel gloves.
Adjustable trekking poles.

Upper Body
Long sleeve base layer, light colored, sun and mosquito protection.
T-shirt for lower elevations (optional).
Soft Shell or fleece jacket.
Down/synthetic puffy jacket light-to-medium weight.
Hard shell jacket with hood Waterproof and breathable.
1 Pair liner gloves.
1 Pair medium weight gloves.
Warm hat Wool or synthetic.
Balaclava.
Sun hat or baseball cap.
Glacier glasses 100% UV protection with side shields and a hard-sided storage case.
Extra pair of sunglasses.

Sleeping Gear
Sleeping bag Rated to at least 10-20º F. Line the stuff sack w/plastic bag.
Sleeping pad Full length closed cell foam.
Thermarest (bring repair kit).

Backpack
Day pack 1800-3000 cubic inch for approach hike and summit day (a full pack is not required as we use porters).
1 Large duffel bag.
1 Small duffel bag for leaving clean clothes etc at Timika.
Locks for duffel bags.
Backpack Cover – waterproof.
Stuff sacks & plastic bags– waterproof.

Lower Body
1-2 Pair light-medium weight base layer.
1-2 pair lightweight short underwear.
1 Pair soft shell trousers.
1 Pair nylon shorts quick-drying type.
Lightweight pants for hiking.
Shell trousers Waterproof/breathable with full side zips.

Carstensz Pyramid Trekking Boots Scarpa Charmoz GTX
Carstensz Pyramid Trekking Boots Scarpa Charmoz GTX

Footwear
Trekking Boots.
Wellingtons (these must be knee-high and fitted with trekking boot insoles; you will spend much more time walking in Wellingtons than trekking boots).
Gaiters.
Sandals or light hiking/trail shoes for use at camp.
2 Pair of liner socks.
2 Pair wool/synthetic socks Medium weight.

purificup water purifier for Carstensz Pyramid gear
Purificup for clean water on Carstensz Pyramid

Miscellaneous Equipment
Personal first aid kit Basics: blister kit, Band-Aids, first-aid tape, ibuprofen, personal medications, etc.

Lip balm At least SPF 20, 2 sticks.
Sunscreen At least SPF 40.
Insect repellant Small bottle.
Headlamp plus one set spare batteries.
2-3 Water bottles 1 liter wide-mouth Nalgene.
Pee bottle.
Pocket knife mid-size.
Water purification Silver ion, Chlorine or Iodine tablets.
Hand sanitizer.
Toiletry kit Be sure to include toilet paper stored in a plastic bag.
Camp towel.
Bandanas (one, optional).
Neck gaiter (optional).
Snacks and/or munchies Bring your favorite “trail foods” or desserts, pack in Ziplocs. Preferably to include extra protein.
Camera Optional; large SLR types are not recommended.
Paperback books.
Walkman etc + 2 sets earphones.
Solar charger.
Small stainless thermos (optional).
Umbrella (optional but recommended).

Carstensz Pyramid Solar Power Battery Pack
Solar Power via Goal Zero for Carstensz Pyramid Climb

Carstensz Pyramid Gear List From Carstensz-Expedition
Guide 10 Solar Powered Battery Pack from Goal Zero
Purificup Water Purification System.

Safe Water in Mexico with Purificup

Before I left for Orizaba I was concerned about getting safe water in Mexico. I’ve been sick on a few mountains before. I didn’t want to risk this summit on bad water. I went to Orizaba in 2008 and was too weak and inexperienced to finish. I felt ready this time. I have been using the Purificup Water Purifier. It’s small convenient and easy to use.

Safe water in Mexico packing my filter
The Purificup in place with my gear before I left for Orizaba

To ensure safe water in Mexico I packed my Purificup with my other gear before I left. I usually pack it in a neoprene bicycle bottle cover. It’s the right size, and can help prevent bangs, scratches, and freezing. Here I wrote about how to prepare and how to use the Purificup. I was very impressed with the way it provided safe water in Argentina when I attempted Aconcagua.

Purificup in Neoprene Sleeve for Safe water in Mexico
Purificup Upper Left in Blue Neoprene Sleeve

Safe water in Tlachichuca Mexico

My friend Todd and I used Servimont, an Orizaba logistics company in Tlachichuca. We stayed in their bunkhouse. Across the courtyard from the lodge is a bath house with sinks. I went to make safe water in Tlachichuca with my Purificup. I set my Nalgene on the nearly level window sill and removed the caps from the Purificup. The filter unit fits over the wide mouth bottle. I filled the dirty water cup from the faucet and set it atop the filter, then walked away to do other stuff while gravity did its thing.

Safe water in Tlachicuca at Servimont
Purificup in the window sill at the Servimont Bath house

In the meanwhile, Todd used his pump filter unit. He filled an empty one quart poly sports drink bottle with dirty water. He stuck the hose from the filter into that bottle, and the other end of the hose into his Nalgene. He started pumping.

Safe water in Tlachichuca with a pump filter
Todd pumping water through his filter unit

I went back and forth sorting my gear and filling the cup at the top of the Purificup. Three nearly-full cups is a liter of water in the Nalgene. It takes only a few minutes per cup, and the best part is it can be done without any intervention or attention. In no time I had two full Nalgenes.

safe water in Mexico with gravity fed Purificup
Filling the Nalgene with purified water via gravity and Purificup

Todd on the other hand was still pumping away. And getting warm in the sun from his efforts. After he was done he still had to catch up on the gear sorting I’d been able to do in between fills of the Purificup.

Safe water in Mexico with water filtration
Still pumping at the filter in the Servimont facility in Tlachichuca

Long story short I was able to get four liters of water ready for our first day on the mountain. Sadly, or happily as the case may be, we managed to hit the summit within 30 hours of arriving at base camp. Otherwise I was going to test the Purificup with the surface and irrigation water. Probably a lot like the water on Aconcagua I expect. A normal trip to Piedra Grande base camp at 14,000′ on the route to the 18,500′ summit of Orizaba spends about 3-4 days acclimatizing before the summit.

Orizaba highest mountain in Mexico
Todd and I on the Summit of Orizaba at 18,500′ highest mountain in Mexico

After we returned home, Todd said he needs to check out the Purificup for his future climbing trips.

Elbrus 2012 Resting at the Barrels Huts

On Friday, Sept 7, I moved up to the Barrels Huts at the 12,300′ level on Elbrus, a volcano in Russia, the highest point of Europe and one of the Seven Summits. On this trip I first encountered the Barrels on my acclimatization hike of Tuesday September 4 from Cheget to the Barrels.

The Barrels Huts (capitalized because that’s their actual name in Russian) are just what it sounds like – large steel drums, about 30’ long and 10’ in diameter tipped on their sides with doors and windows cut out and beds and little room dividers built in. They’re set in a long row side by side along a large flat spot a few hundred feet above the chairlift. Or almost 1000’ above Mir Station. — Elbrus, My Waterloo – publishing October 2012

I went up again on Thursday for another acclimatization hike, this time from Mir (Tram Station) to Pastukhova Rocks at 15,300′. I returned Friday to spend the night for my summit attempt on Saturday. The Barrels are a very popular tourist destination. When the weather is good, and the lifts are running, average people in jackets and street shoes can quite easily get there and enjoy the views.

On a pleasant weekend day there will be a hundred tourists sitting in the sun staring at the groups of other tourists and climbers going up and down the cat track, and clicking like crazy with their cameras. Some will even have binoculars. The administrator sent me to barrel number four. I stepped up the four narrow ladder rungs and inside, first the vestibule area with old gear storage racks and the old bathroom door, sealed with a very large padlock. Way back in the day they used to have bathrooms and cooking in each of the Barrels. No longer, and you have to use the kitchen and the very dirty outhouses. — Elbrus, My Waterloo – publishing October 2012

I spent the afternoon laying out and organizing my stuff, and purifying water with my PurifiCup, and charging my electronics with my Goal Zero Guide 10

Back at the hut, I again switched to the trail shoes and hung the socks to dry on one of the many crisscrossed cords above the beds. Drying out gear is common enough that many tents and huts have installed lines just for that purpose. I set my phone to charge on the Goal Zero Guide 10 battery pack, and took my boots out, removing the insoles to allow for full air circulation, to dry in the sun. I sat next to them on a slat of wood laid on the concrete for just that use, to enjoy the warm rays of daylight. — Elbrus, My Waterloo – publishing October 2012

I spent Friday night there, sleeping quite coldly, in my bunk in #4 Hut, with no electric heaters, as in 2010.

It got colder and colder as the night progressed, and I huddled snuggly, but cold, in my 15 degree down bag. I ended up running to the outhouse a few times in the night. On a trip out around 4:00 AM I saw a group on the concrete slabs getting their crampons on but when I returned to the hut they were gone. A few minutes later I heard a snowcat start and grind its way up the slope. A part of me wished I were on it. — Elbrus, My Waterloo – publishing October 2012

After my failed summit attempt I returned to the Barrels and dried out my clothes and charged my electronics. I have been to the Barrels many times now, with two trips in 2010 (May in a group climb with Pilgrim Tours, and in September with Top Sport Travel for Elbrus Race 2010) and now this one. I love them, in spite of the dirty outhouses and bedding, in spite of the cold and damp, in spite of the tourists milling about on the concrete slabs during the sunny days.

I spent a few seconds in my exploration to examine all the decals stuck on the walls by various climbers and guides. It’s kind of fun to see what there is from around the world. Lots of interesting graffiti too, but of the generally “clean” kind – like so and so from whatever country climbed in whatever year. — Elbrus, My Waterloo – publishing October 2012

Gallery for The Barrels on Elbrus

KPICASA_GALLERY(HangingAtTheBarrelsOnElbrus)