Tag: guided trip

Elbrus Race Tourist Itinerary 2013

Recently in my Facebook Page I commented that it would be fun to see if anyone wanted to climb Elbrus, one of the Seven Summits, during the Race this year. I am in the process of ironing out the details with my Russian Guide friend, but I have been able to get a prospective itinerary.

Elbrus Race 2010 - racers at about 14,300' above the Barrels hut
Elbrus Race 2010 – racers at about 14,300′ above the Barrels hut

VIII International Elbrus Race 2013 Tourist Program :

Date Days Day’s program
15.09.2013 day 01 Flight arrival to Min Vody. Transfer to Baksan Valley. Accommodation in the Hotel.
16.09.2013 day 02 Acclimatization Hike TBD. Accommodation in the Hotel.
17.09.2013 day 03 Transfer to Azau lift station. The opening of the competition. Going up to refuge “Barrels” ~3710m. Night at refuge “Barrels”
18.09.2013 day04 Early morning acclimatization hike to the Pastukova rocks, 4800 m. Racers arrive about 12:30 PM
19.09.2013 day 05 Relax day. Night at the refuge “Barrels” (full moon at 15:00 pm)
20.09.2013 day 06 2:00 AM Alpine start – begin climb of Mt. Elbrus 5642 m. Racers arrive about 10:00 AM
21.09.2013 day 07 Spare day for weather, summit climb, or Race or Awards Ceremony at the morning & The farewell party at the evening
22.09.2013 day 08 Transfer to airport. Flight from Min Vody.

As a disclaimer, I’d like to point out that this is a traditional itinerary for climbing the mountain, and while it is concurrent with the race, is not participating in the race. People who are qualified and interested in the race should contact me privately for instruction and advice.

Additionally, this is a rough itinerary based on current discussions with the Russian Logistics company, and is subject to availability of rooms, transportation, and Russian Guides during the event. My most recent communication suggests that we might extend it out to 9 days, September 23, and do the P-Rock hike on September 19, and the Summit on September 21 or 22. Because my contact is a working guide, and Russia is 12 hours time difference from me, there is a communication gap.

Prices and exact dates and times will be posted in the near future. Thanks for your patience.

Update 10 July 2013:

My Russian associate has responded with an 8-day and 11-day itinerary for this trip. The rates will be in the 600-700 Euro range assuming 2-4 participants. It would be a bit different for either more or less climbers. This price does not include the cost of snowcats, guides, and a few meals on the “on your own” acclimatization days. I will get more details when I return from Alpamayo.

Kilimanjaro Summit January 1 2010 – Photo Gallery Rerun

In December of 2009 I flew through Amsterdam to Kilimanjaro Airport in Tanzania, and was shuttled to the hotel in Moshi for Zara Tours. The next day our small group boarded a bus with our gear and headed to the Machame Gate. Over the next 5 days we ascended through daily rain to the Barafu Camp and that night, New Years Eve, we took off for the summit shortly after midnight, accompanied by the singing and pan-beating of the celebrating porters.

After a fairly steep climb in rocks and snow we hit the relatively gentle final grade to the summit just after sunrise. We took a few pictures then headed back down to camp for lunch and a nap. I was a little under-dressed, wearing old ski and hiking clothes to donate to the porters, and had to borrow some softshell pants, as mine were soaked from the rainy day hikes. I had to wiggle my toes a lot in my three-season hiking boots, but I think it only got down to maybe 10 degrees F that night at the coldest – about 3 AM.

Kilimanjaro is the highest point of Africa, and is also the highest volcano in Africa, so is a member of both the Seven Summits and the Volcanic Seven Summits. I’d love to do it again, and have contemplated putting together various groups of friends or relatives, or even charity contributors. Oh, well. Enjoy these selected pics from my “rerun” gallery.

KPICASA_GALLERY(KiliRecap)

If you want to read a summary I wrote after the fact here’s a link to the “expose”

Alaska Photo Gallery Recap – May 2011

Was going through my old picasa galleries and came across this from May 2011. Climbed with Mountaintrip attempting the Northwest Buttress Route. This is not the West Buttress – this one goes up from the Peters Glacier – you access it by going over Kahiltna Pass on the West Buttress Route, then drop down to Peters and cross over to the route from there.

I was doing good until the Kahiltna Pass Camp, where I got really sick and after a couple days was able to self-evacuate with the assistance of one of the guides and two passing climbers he was friends with. Going up Heartbreak Hill while sick was pretty tough. Later my family physician diagnosed an inflamed gall bladder and recommended some dietary changes that might impact future trips with guided services.

As an aside, my group did make the North Summit (lower) but did not make the South Summit (highest and normal climb).

Anyway, enjoy these great pics and let me know if you have any favorites.

KPICASA_GALLERY(AlaskaMay2011)

Is This Your Brain on Adventure?

In June of 2009 I had a pivotal experience on Liberty Ridge on a trip guided by IMG guides Mark Allen and Jeff Ward. We barely survived summiting in 60 + MPH winds, wandering along steep cliffs and crevasses in a whiteout to spend the night in a moat (ice cave) 120′ below the surface of the glacier. Over the course of the trip I realized my own comfort level was off a bit compared to “normal” people, including sleeping 6″ overhanging the edge of a 75 degree ice slope:

The camp is basically a couple of tent platforms on a 45 degrees slope, beautiful and exposed; with very little room to move around. Blue-bagging will be a challenge here; but we all do our duties. We cook dinner, and I try to eat as much as I can. Little that I knew at the time, I would not have another meal in 30 hours. We settle again for the night, I am glad I am sleeping on the uphill side; Ann is in the middle and Rick just over the edge. His position does nothing to prevent him to quickly fall sleep and soundly snore throughout the short night. Thankfully I am well equipped with drugs and earplugs. Jeff announces start time for 2:00am. – Dodging Bullets on Liberty Ridge – Claudio Argento – Alpine Lines Blog


I also realized my own comfort level on Alpine Mixed terrain of steep slopey blocks of rock and ice and mud, and shallow (AI 2-3) ice. My climbing friends all say this is not normal. I normally don’t think about this too much, and just take it for granted, but today I received a notification for an article on Outside Online Magazine about the differences in brain chemistry or physiology for abnormal risk takers, quoted here:

There are three major emotional ingredients to risk taking … all driven by individual brain chemistry. One is desire for adventure (“sensation seeking”), in what’s known as the reward pathway of the brain, the mysterious mechanisms where happiness juices flow; high-risk takers may simply get a bigger bang than other people, leading them to seek more intense experiences. Another is a relative disregard for harm, meaning, basically, that they’re not as afraid of negative consequences as regular folks. The third is impulsivity, or acting on your desires without fully thinking them through. — What distinguishes an everyday adventurer from an extreme or foolhardy one lies in the interplay of these factors. Mountaineers may be adventurous and well able to handle stress, but they tend not to be impulsive, often carefully planning their expeditions for months. – This Is Your Brain on Adventure – Outside Magazine

While on my Seven Summits Quest, I have had all 10 fingers nearly to the wooden stage, been stopped dead in my tracks unable to breath, been struck by the static discharge of close lightning, been up all night gasping for breath, had nearly non-stop diarrhea for days, spent the night in a tent with a puking partner, twisted my ankle with a 16 mile hike out, frost-nipped my face so I stopped shaving, lost and blackened toenails, endured bleeding blisters, nearly exploded gall bladder. Yet I persist on this pursuit, and have plans for more summits in the coming years.

While training Mixed Climbing (dry tooling) in Ouray last week, I managed to pop off a very vertical (read: overhanging) cliff face and swung out inverted (upside down) about 60′ from the ground, and as I swung out, still hanging onto my ice tools, silent, I thought to myself “I don’t seem to be sliding out of my loosely-worn harness. Good. So if I can tap the wall when I come back in, maybe I can straighten up and sit right.” It worked and I managed to come back into the wall on a shelf and shake it out. Picture below is just after I tapped my right foot, flagging my left foot as I swung back upright at the end of the pendulum. I had fallen from the left wall under the ice curtain.


Was/am I in denial? Are you in denial? If you’re going to consider the Seven Summits, please consider the risk with an open mind. People die every year on almost every one of the Seven Summits, even the so-called easy ones. I was saddened to hear about some recent deaths on Elbrus, for climbers I met during the Elbrus Race 2010:

Rescuers have found a body of a Ukrainian climber, Maryna Khytriakova, at the height of 4,700 meters on Mount Elbrus – Ukrainian female climber found dead on Elbrus – Kyiv Post

Anyone who climbs for a long time will eventually have lists of friends and acquaintances who were crippled, maimed or killed while climbing. Denali and Everest are particularly notorious among the Seven Summits for annual deaths. Aconcagua has many deaths as well, though not being so much in the headlines. Do yourself a favor and think, consider where you are on these lists, where you could be, and plan appropriately.

How much does it cost to climb Mount Everest?

How much does it cost to climb Mount Everest? (Outside Magazine)

I saw this article referred to in a couple blogs and news services (Time Magazine), and had to read it. Very interesting to say the least. I’ve been on the edge of an Everest expedition for a few years now, since just after Kili when Angie told me I had to Everest. Alan Arnette does an excellent job of making the cost of climbing Everest comprehensible to the average climber, and especially arm-chair climber.

Aconcagua Basecamp Food
Cooked with care at Aconcagua Basecamp

If saving money is the goal [of going solo], you will be disappointed. Every climber and expedition must pay for a permit, liaison officer, visa, park fee, Icefall route management, fixed ropes, waste deposit, travel, and insurance. Then there is gear, food, tents, oxygen, and sherpa support. Add in and the bill comes out to at least $35K per person for a seven-person team, or $60K for a solo climber.

By sharing the fixed and transportation expenses (permits, logistics, fees, etc.) among 6 or more climbers in a group, you save quite a bit. Total costs for a participant in a guided trip are estimated between $30-100K, while expenses for a solo climber are estimated around $60K and higher.

If you opt to fly solo, according to Arnette’s estimates, at the high end of the spectrum that will total $82,900. Still feeling intrepid? For that cost, you could get a new Audi A8, a three-bedroom house in Schenectady, N.Y., or 150 iPads.

Keep in mind that these articles offer price ranges, and that there are expeditions costing over $100,000 per climber on Everest.

On some expeditions, you will also receive a higher quality of food. One service likes to promote their sushi, another their five-star chef. Some offer espresso machines and open bars. The sky’s the limit, all at a price.


So let me know how you feel about this…

1) I’d rather have the Audi
2) I’d rather have the 150 iPads
3) I am being supported by my charity, so expense is nothing to me
4) I like my La-Z-Boy a lot, thankyou.
5) I like my toes a lot, thankyou.
6) It’s way worth it and I’m going to go no matter what
7) Schenectady probably isn’t as bad as it sounds