Tag: Celebrity

Olympic Medal Heads to Everest Summit

Kenton Cool, who has climbed Everest a record (for a British mountaineer) 9 times will be carrying a special package to the top of Everest this season.

he will have honoured a pledge by Lieutenant Colonel Edward Lisle Strutt, deputy leader of the pioneering 1922 expedition, made to Baron Pierre de Coubertin, who awarded the climbers medals at the 1924 Winter Olympics in Chamonix. Strutt promised to return to Everest and take a medal to the summit, something he never managed. — The Guardian


Kenton fell in 1996, shattering his heels and ankles, resulting in a year away from climbing, and still has metal in his legs that causes him to run with an awkward gait. In spite of that, he’ll be running a leg of the 2012 London Olympics Torch Relay on July 23. Having been a guide and taking clients to the top of Everest in the past, this year Kenton will be climbing with only the medal and a cameraman.

The Olympics are an excellent time to review our past and our future and look for the links between and connecting them. I hope this works out for the best and achieves all the goals surrounding it. I love the Olympic Park in Park City Utah where some of the events of the 2002 Winter Olympics were held, such as the various ski jumping and bobsled, luge and skeleton competitions. I would love to visit the upcoming venues in London someday. Good luck Kenton.

2002 Winter Olympic Park
2002 Winter Olympic Park in Park City Utah

What’s up with Prince Harry and Everest?

If you’ve been watching the news, you would have heard an announcement in January that based on the relative success of his North Pole adventure with one of his favorite charities, Prince Harry was intending to walk with Walk with the Wounded to the top, or at least Base Camp, of Everest this year.

Source: thesun.co.uk via Charles on Pinterest


Recently he appears to have waffled on that, and decided to maintain his support for the charity from afar. I’ve read a handful of articles in various online newspapers and a few blogs (including: “Is Prince Harry Really Going to …“) – but really, what does this even mean?

1) Climbing Everest is a great charity donation motivator?
2) Climbing Everest is a great thing for wealthy young fit celebrities to do?
3) Climbing Everest is almost a mainstream event?
4) Climbing Everest is almost meaningless anymore?

I can only imagine the fit his Mother would throw at his intentionally involving himself with an activity possibly slightly more dangerous than driving helicopters. People normally don’t die very often hiking to the North Pole. Everest on the other hand does see a few deaths on average every year.

In a study of 8,030 climbers and 6,108 Sherpas there were 212 climbing deaths between 1921 and 2006 (approximately 1.5%) – based on a study by The British Medical Journal (BMJ ), Vol 337, December 2008, by PG Firth and colleagues

I can certainly see the value in a charity that shows being a disabled war veteran needn’t stop you from doing great things you might believe are lost dreams. I can see that Everest is a great way to walk the walk and show your stuff. I remember being wrapped up in the Discovery documentary showing Mark Inglis’s summit of Everest and his great capacity for endurance and suffering. I see value in celebrities hanging on with charities like this, to offer the support of their fans and supporters. And in the case of Prince Harry, I don’t see that he really stands to gain anything obvious from this either way.

I wish the team at Walking with the Wounded great luck and success on their expedition this year.